The 5% Club Case Study: Anna Schlautmann

The 5% Case Studies offers you an insight into the daily life’s of the apprentices and graduates of the Club’s 19 members. This week, our focus is on award winning MBDA apprentice Anna Schlautmann. Anna was named Apprentice of the Year at the 2013 Manufacturer Awards in December. Read more about Anna’s experiences as a third year Logistics Apprentice at MBDA.

Anna Schlautmann receives her award from Pera Training Chief Executive Richard Grice Copyright Manufacturer 2013

1. What persuaded you to pursue an apprenticeship at MBDA?

I knew that doing an apprenticeship would benefit me more than going to University alone. This is due to the full-time work experience that can be gained, alongside studying the theory at degree level and an NVQ 4. The balance requires hard work and diligence at both.

2. What is your current role?

I am currently a third year Logistics Apprentice working in a placement that involves maintaining the resource pool in manufacturing and analysing the manufacturing workload. This has a vast impact on the business because it helps the business to understand where it needs to maintain skills and knowledge as well as where to meet the project requirements. I have also worked in Project Management on a multi-national missile contract. I was responsible for raising potential risks and opportunities to the project.

3. Describe your daily role at MBDA and the variety of programmes/tasks your involved with.

At MBDA I rotate within placements, for example Supply Chain, Project Management and Logistics. I regularly go into schools and colleges to promote apprenticeships, and specifically women in manufacturing. So far in my apprenticeship, I have visited and presented to 15 schools and colleges, promoting engineering and apprenticeships. This is not solely to inspire young individuals; it is also to influence teachers and parents to know that apprenticeships are a positive route to take.

As teachers and parents are the main influencers of children these days, I ensure that I create a positive image of apprenticeships among that community as well as the young generation, as in my opinion an apprenticeship is the best route.  I am determined to be a role model for apprenticeships; I have therefore chosen to become a STEM ambassador as I would like to inspire young people.

I also co-ordinate the charity challenge team, it is a pleasure to make a difference and host events for charities.

4. What has been the highlight of your apprenticeship so far?

I have had many highlights in my apprenticeship, for example meeting several MPs, touring the house of commons, competing in the national Brathay Apprentice Challenge, promoting manufacturing apprenticeships to girls and making a difference in the workplace. However my biggest highlight was winning the Manufacturer’s National Manufacturer Apprentice of the Year in December 2013.

5. Does an apprenticeship offer benefits that other career routes cannot match? 

I believe that if you compare an apprenticeship to going to university alone, university cannot live up to an apprenticeship. If I was at university I would need work experience to be employable. An apprenticeship offers constant work experience alongside your qualifications, this enables apprentices to understand the business environment and more than any individual studying theory alone.

01-Anna-Schlautmann © MBDA UK Ltd

6. How would you persuade more females to pursue a career in engineering?

I promote apprenticeships at careers events in which two of the new females apprentices who joined this year are a result of me speaking to them at these careers events. I think it is vital for students to see the female apprentices promoting apprenticeships themselves.

Females are not often promoted within applying for engineering, which means they may be discouraged to do so. 50% of apprentices at MBDA are female, so you can ensure that there is no problem with females working in a manufacturing environment.

7. What are your aims for the duration of your apprenticeship?

I aim to achieve a first class honours in my Business Management BA (Hons) degree and I aim to achieve excellent reviews and feedback for all my placements. I also wish to make a real difference and large contribution to the business.

I constantly ask for more opportunities to learn which is my main aim, as I recognise that I am the future of the business and need to ensure I am in shape for this. At MBDA we have experienced workforce and many of our systems have a 30 lifecycle so there this is extreme challenge in terms of demographics. I need to ensure I contribute to this meaningfully and ensure that logistics and business knowledge from the skilled retiring workforce is transferred to myself to ensure vital skills are not lost.

8. What advice would you offer young people seeking an apprenticeship?

If anyone is considering doing an apprenticeship, I would definitely recommend it. Gaining work experience is a fantastic opportunity that not many young people are able to experience.

 

 

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The 5% Club Case Study: Ella Ellisdon

A happy New Year from all at The 5% Club!

We thought we’d kick off 2014 with a case study, so meet Ella Ellisdon, an Astrium Engineering apprentice from aerospace and defence company EADS.

Ella Ellisdon EADSName: Ella Ellisdon

Division: Engineering

Location: Stevenage

I have been an Astrium Engineering apprentice since September 2012; I joined as I got to spend the first year studying for PEO (Performing Engineering Operations) and BTEC National in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering qualifications at Highbury College in Portsmouth.

I am currently in industry doing real hands on work for the company, studying for my NVQ level 3, as well as doing block release back to college to gain a HNC in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. This will continue for my final two years on the apprenticeship.

A massive positive of this apprenticeship scheme with Astrium, is that you get to move around the company, working under different people, doing different types of engineering in each placement. This gives the apprentices the chance to develop themselves and gives the opportunity to see what department you would potentially like to end up in.

Every day is different, and being able to adapt and change to different challenges that arise, makes the work place a great place to be a team member of.

 

The 5% Club Case Study: Rebecca Thomas

In the last case study of 2013 from The 5% Club, meet Rebecca Thomas, a maritime graduate from QinetiQ.

Rebecca Thomas QinetiQ

Name: Rebecca Thomas

Position: Maritime Graduate

Studied: BEng Mechanical Engineering, Southampton University

I am currently part of the new Maritime Graduate Scheme at QinetiQ. The scheme lasts for approximately 18 months and will consist of 6, 3 month long modules. Each module will take place in a different area of the maritime division and allow me to gain a real appreciation for the variety of tasks undertaken in the business.

I have had the opportunity to work on a wide range of projects and have helped carry out model tests in the QinetiQ Ocean Basin in Haslar. The work has been really varied and enjoyable and I feel like I have learnt a lot in the short time I have been here. In January I will move onto a placement at Winfrith, Dorset. I’m looking forward to getting out onto the ranges and seeing how it all works!

In terms of career aspirations my main focus at the moment is professional development and I aim to achieve chartered status within the next 5 years. In the longer term I would like to become proficient at project management and hopefully become responsible for some of the exciting, big projects that QinetiQ works on.

 

The 5% Club Case Study: Dan Rigby

This week’s case study focuses on Dan Rigby of EADS. Having joined as a graduate in 2011, Dan is now a project leader on the Airbus A320 program. Read on to learn more of Dan’s time as a graduate at one of The 5% Club’s founding members.

Dan Rigby EadsI joined the Airbus graduate scheme in 2011 after completing an engineering apprenticeship with the RAF, during which I worked on the Airbus Hawker program and completed a Business Studies Degree.

During my time as a lean graduate with a passion to improve and transform business processes, I had the privilege to work on various projects including the re-engineering of the A380 skin-to-rib process, the relocation of A350 wing equipping business and operational management of A320 during a production rate increase.

Over the course of the scheme I have witnessed the first flight of the A350, I have seen the introduction of Sharklet wing-tip and now the A320 NEO (New Engine Option).  I also had the opportunity for a meeting and guided tour at Number 10 Downing Street during a placement in EADS.

Today, with my graduate scheme behind me, I am a project leader and Executive Assistant to the head of the A320 program. I am responsible for delivering a fully integrated enablement solution ensuring that as a team we meet our cost, quality and delivery objectives through optimising processes and reducing all forms of waste.

 

The 5% Club Case Study: Tom Wheatley

In the latest in the series of The 5% Club case studies, we take a look at Tom Wheatley, a third year QinetiQ  aeronautical apprentice at MOD Boscombe Down. Find out more about Tom’s daily role, plus his thoughts on The 5% Club.

Tom Wheatley The 5% ClubBefore I embarked on my apprenticeship at QinetiQ, I did A-Levels with the aim of being a landscape designer.  I decided to take time out of education and worked for a year but realised gardening wasn’t for me.

After looking at various options, what I knew I didn’t want to do was to go to university. I learn practically and, although Uni is right for some careers, apprenticeships are great for practical learners like me. So the path that I decided to go down was to train as an apprentice with a view to entering the engineering industry, developing valuable skills whilst learning ‘on the job’. Despite strong competition, I was fortunate enough to enrol at the QinetiQ Apprentice Training School at MOD Boscombe Down, and I can safely say that I haven’t looked back since.

My dad was a one-time apprentice and his experiences helped me to understand what an apprenticeship entailed and the opportunities that it could hand me.

What I really like about the QinetiQ apprenticeship scheme is the sheer versatility of the programme. Upon enrolling, my initial ambition was to train to become an aircraft engineer. However, the breadth of learning here and the proximity you have to different areas of the company has meant that my career path has changed.

At QinetiQ, you can really carve out your own career without being pigeonholed, whilst still developing a wide set of skills that are transferrable. The company allows you to target your own goals, and they provide you with all the support and rewards you need.

Another aspect of the apprenticeship that I have really benefited from is the opportunity to work within the company itself, amongst experienced QinetiQ staff. Working alongside my future colleagues has enabled me to earn their respect and it represents a great practical experience too.

Throughout my apprenticeship at QinetiQ, I have worked in a calm and unpressurised environment that has allowed me to refine and develop various skills, ready for real-world situations. There is a newly refurbished aircraft hangar at MOD Boscombe Down which now forms part of the QinetiQ Apprentice Training School, and will be a hugely important aspect of our practical education.

The hangar now gives students much more space and provides us with the right equipment to develop skills, including de-commissioned aircraft that will be used for practical lessons.

There are two rotary-aircraft within the hangar: a Lynx and a Gazelle helicopter, as well as a fixed-wing Bulldog aircraft, aircraft engines and components. My fellow apprentices and myself are going to gain vast experience working on these  and by learning ‘live’ in this environment, we are getting a head start on others who enter the industry as undergraduates.

Tom’s thoughts on The 5% Club:

The 5% Club is a very positive and important initiative. Apprenticeships are a rather unknown entity amongst school leavers and that is something that I feel must change.

Young people are often presented with just two choices when leaving school; start working with no training, or go to university. Apprenticeships have until recently been seen as an unattractive ‘other’ route, and aren’t fully understood by school leavers.  From my own experience, apprenticeships are a comparable option to University and a fantastic way to get into the work place. They can increase chances of employment, whilst also being paid at the same time – that is something that a university course cannot compete with.

If the 5% Club can increase awareness of apprenticeships schemes as well as inspire other companies to provide further opportunities for those who wish to get their foot on the careers ladder, then it could have a massive impact on my generation.

 

The 5% Club Case Study: Sam Edlin

Sam EdlinSam Edlin of QinetiQ is the focus of The Five Club Case Study this week. Find out more about his day to day role as a graduate in the Maritime division:

Name: Sam Edlin

Position: Maritime Graduate

Started: September 2013

Studied: Systems Engineering MEng at Loughborough University

 

 

I joined QinetiQ and the Maritime Graduate Scheme in September this year. The scheme lasts for 18 months and is designed to give graduates a taste of the range of areas that the Maritime Division has to offer by running 6, 3-month placements in the division. I am currently on my first placement in Maritime Communications. In January I will be moving to a new area of Maritime where I will be joining the Naval Combat Systems group.

The work I do day-to-day is varied, one day I could be testing some equipment on a submarine, the next I could be back at my office in Portsdown Technology Park working with customers for future developments.

In addition to my work in the graduate scheme I am looking to continue my professional development and gain chartered engineer status. QinetiQ has already provided my with some great opportunities and experiences, I look forward to an exciting career!

The 5% Club Case Study: Natasha Pitts

Dale Power Solutions‘ Higher Apprentice, Natasha Pitts, was honoured at the National Apprenticeship Awards last week, taking home the Highly Commended award in recognition for her exceptional work as a higher apprentice.Natasha Pitts The 5% Club

Natasha has worked at Dale Power Solutions since September 2010 on an Advanced Apprenticeship in electrical and electronic engineering. She completed her Advanced Apprenticeship 2 years early and progressed onto a Higher Apprenticeship.

Natasha’s Apprenticeship has helped her to become a valued team member and is seen as a star of the future and a role model to all apprentices. She has helped to develop training equipment for Dale Power Solutions training partner (Derwent Training) to enhance the learning experience of other apprentices.

Natasha is very passionate about engineering and science and is very proud to promote engineering and the power of apprenticeships in local schools through her role as a STEM ambassador and encourages young people into stimulating, rewarding and enjoyable careers through an apprenticeship.

On receiving her Highly Commended award, Natasha said: “I am very proud to have achieved the highly commended award at the national apprenticeship awards finals in Birmingham. It is both a privilege and an honour to achieve such an award, to be in the top 3 in the country is a fantastic achievement and one that I could have only dreamt of when I joined Dale 3 years ago as an advanced apprentice.”

Tim Wilkins, Chief Executive of Dale Power Solutions, said: “Natasha is a fantastic example of the contribution apprentices have made to our business and how they become part of the future of our business and an integral part of Dale Power Solutions team.”